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Biochemstry

Major

Did you know that in the last fifty years, there has been a revolution in understanding life at the molecular level?  These advances have helped humanity explore disease and life, and push the limits of what is known. While studying biochemistry, you will learn about the molecular and chemical building blocks that define life at the submicroscopic level.  You will learn how these processes should work and how disease can be understood by their disfunction.  You will conduct research to practice what you have learned in the classroom and develop critical thinking to engage with the challenging questions still being explored on campus and beyond. 

Student Research

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Characterizing the Mechanism of Chaperone Function of Alpha B Crystallin

Characterizing the Mechanism of Chaperone Function of Alpha B Crystallin

Carlos Suarez & Duy-Dan Thai 

Identification and Analysis of Palindromic Sequences in E. coli to Determine Evolutionary Conservation

Identification and Analysis of Palindromic Sequences in E. coli to Determine Evolutionary Conservation

Antonio Saavedra, Saif Ahmed, and Chad Garner 

Effects of Site-Directed Mutations on the Beta 2-Microglobulin Protein

Effects of Site-Directed Mutations on the Beta 2-Microglobulin Protein  

Ainsley Nelson   

The Fibrous Co-assembly of Oppositely Charged α-helical Peptides

The Fibrous Co-assembly of Oppositely Charged α-helical Peptides

Austin Rue

Effects of Post-translational Modifications on Protein Misfolding and aggregation Kinetics

Effects of Post-translational Modifications on Protein Misfolding and aggregation Kinetics

Abbigale Ballard

Rational Design of Peptides as Therapeutic Inhibitors

Rational Design of Peptides as Therapeutic Inhibitors 

Frank Goodavish

Finish in Four*

with the skills to launch your career 

As a biochemistry major,

you will strengthen and refine your skills as a scientist in communication, critical thinking, and collaboration. With a degree in biochemistry, upon graduation you will be prepared to:

  • clearly communicate the results of scientific work in oral, written, and electronic formats to both scientists and the public at large; 
  • demonstrate problem-solving, critical thinking and analytical reasoning as applied to scientific problems;  
  • design and carry out scientific experiments, as well as accurately record and analyze the results of such experiments; and  
  • understand the ethical impacts of advanced scientific breakthroughs. 

Explore our Graduate Outcomes to learn more about what our graduates are doing today. 

Adams Observatory

All thoughtful and scientifically trained people are called to lead at some point in their lives. The STAR Leadership program works to ensure that graduates are not only well prepared to work in STEM fields but are also empowered to lead in their careers and communities.

Read More about STAR Leadership

Meet our Faculty

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Popular Courses

  • Introduction to Biochemistry 
  • Biochemical Metabolism 
  • Thermodynamics and Kinetics 
  • Molecular Biology of the Chromosome 
  • Introduction to Data Science with Python